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Category: History of Paris

THE PARISIAN GASTRONOMY

gastronomie-parisienne

Parisian gastronomy is present in all the good Parisian restaurants and brasseries. You will taste various cheeses, dishes, pastries and other entries.

Here is a panorama of the various foods that make up French gastronomy and Parisian know-how.

Cheeses from Parisian gastronomy

There are a hundred Parisian cheeses including Brie which was created in an agricultural region of the east of Paris. You will also find Coulommiers, the chevru, the pavement of Doue and the Fontainebleau used for the cake of the same name.

Fruits and vegetables in Parisian gastronomy

There is a wide variety of Parisian fruits and vegetables. The mushroom of Paris is a symbolic vegetable of Paris. At the end of the 19th century, more than 300 producers cultivated the mushroom of Paris on a total of 1000 tons annual in 1875. It is produced in the suburbs and in Paris until 1895. It seems that the real mushroom of Paris is grown in the cellars on layers of limestone …

The cherry of Montmorency is also symbolic of Parisian gastronomy.

Meats and dishes in Parisian gastronomy

Poultry is also part of Parisian cuisine, a specialty formerly served at the Court of Louis XIV. We will also highlight the pig belonging to the traditional ham of Paris. As for charcuterie, we will find the sausage of Paris with garlic and spices. Meats are used in traditional dishes such as beef stew, roast rib and black pudding from Paris.

Breads and pastries in the Parisian gastronomy

Among the Parisian breads, you will find the famous baguette as well as Briare bread and Vexin bread and the croissant.

Among the pastries, you will find the Bourdaloue pie, the saint-honore, the opera, the brioche of Nanterre, the millefeuille, the financier made for the majority with dough with cabbage. These pastries for the most part were designed by a great Parisian chef Marie-Antoine Carême precursor of pastry and confectionery …

Traditional Parisian dishes

The traditional Parisian dishes that can be mentioned are the onion soup, the eel matelote, the croque-monsieur …

When you are visiting Paris and for information on Parisian restaurants, check out the staff at our Aloha hostel.

WHY DO PARISIANS MISS REPUTATION ?

parisien

Parisians have always had a bad reputation whether in the provinces or abroad. Known for being in a hurry, distant, impolite, the city of Paris is positioned in 4th place of the least welcoming cities behind Johannesburg, Cannes and Moscow according to an American magazine “Condé Nast Traveler”.

But why do Parisians have such a bad reputation?

The quality of reception of Parisians towards foreign tourists

Parisians are famous for their lack of warmth and a neglected welcome. According to tourists, it is rare to find people available in the capital to guide them, help them whether on the street or at the airport example. Similarly in Paris museums, the staff is cold and remote ordering to open his bag and mount his ticket …

Courtesy is another black point of the painting. Few Parisians apologize after jostling a person in a hurry in transport or in the street again.

Tourists and provincials thus depict a negative image of Parisians while everything is more playful and warm abroad.

But are the Parisians really so distant and unpleasant as it is said?

This same American magazine affirms that the attitude of the Parisians is nevertheless in progress compared to before. Some tourists claim to have been badly welcomed 50 years ago and find the Parisians nicer now.

The opinion is therefore variable depending on whether it is an Irish student or a Korean tourist for example. You will always find one or more people cold and distant and a person welcoming and warm, otherwise why Paris would be one of the most visited cities in the world ?

During your stay in Paris, remember to book your accommodation with our friendly staff at our hostel Aloha.

THE SMALL PARISIAN COFFEE-THEATERS

cafe-theatre

With the success of one-man-shows, the Parisian theaters are on the rise. These are part of the French artistic heritage and allow little-known comedians to make themselves known to the public.

But do you know when did they appear and what are the main coffee-theaters in Paris ?

Here is a presentation of these highlights.

The beginning of cafe-theaters: cafes first and foremost

The creation of cafes theaters was done in the 1960s in the main French cities. Restaurant managers then allow comedians to introduce themselves and play in their establishment in front of an audience originally coming to eat. The comics then pass with their hat at the end of performance to solicit income.

In Paris, the theatrical cafes were quickly successful on the Left Bank and at Pigalle and in the Marais and quickly shadows the famous Parisian cabarets. Establishments with less than 50 seats bet on new talents.

Some addresses of Parisian cafe-theaters not to be missed!

The cafe-theater “The end” in Pigalle and its 38 seats serves as a training center of French humorists. Comedians like Shirley Souagnon walked the stage. The establishment is also in partnership with the school of one-man-show in Paris. Comedies as well as children’s plays are also played.

La Petite Loge a few steps from the station Saint-Georges is an old theater for children and so small that the stage measures three square meters with 25 seats making it the smallest room in the capital!

Every year the hall and armchairs are restored. Artists like Gaspard Proust and Arnaud Ducret have walked this scene.

The room Popul’Air composed of about forty seats in the district of Belleville to keep its period style. The actors are paid in the hat as in the original tradition. There is an atmosphere of troquet and the reputation of this room by word of mouth.

The Paname Art café is more recent since it opened in 2008. It has fifty seats and artists like Fary and Norman were on stage. It is possible to eat before each show.

During your visit in Paris, do not wait and book your room in Aloha.

THE HISTORY OF THE PLACE OF CONCORD

place-de-la-concorde

The Place of Concord in the center of which stands the obelisk of Luxor is located not far from the Champs Elysees and Tuileries Garden among others. It has a very particular history and is part of the French heritage.

Here is a return on its appearance and how it has evolved over the centuries.

The origin of the Place : 1763-1772

The Place of Concord was built by the architect Anges-Jacques Gabriel and was completed in 1772. Initially the statue of King Louis XV was located in the center and was called Place Louis XV. The place will evolve according to the events of History.

The Place of Concorde under the Revolution

At this time, the Place of Concord goes from a festive atmosphere to a gloomy atmosphere with the disappearance of the statue of the king replaced by a scaffold surmounted by a guillotine used for executions of the city characters Robespierre and Danton for example.

The Place of Concord under the restoration in 1846

It was during the reign of Louis Philippe that the place was transformed and embellished. The new architect at the origin is Jaque Hittorf. It is in 1795 that it is called Place of Concord to emphasize the reconciliation of the French after the Revolution. It was also in 1836 that the Obelisk was installed. The one comes from Luxor and dates from the 13th century.

Did you know that 6 years had passed between the donation of this item and its installation in the square ?

The Place of Concorde today

Nowadays the Place is classified as a historical monument since 1937. It is located not far from the most famous places in Paris: the National Assembly, the Tuileries Garden, the Champs Elysées, the Orangerie Museum

The Ferris Wheel, located a few steps away, was installed in 2000.

Today the obelisk is covered with a gold leaf headdress dating back to 1998 and funded by the Pierre Berge-Yves Saint Laurent Foundation.

During your stay at our hostel, take a detour to this beautiful historic square during your visit.

THE SMALL PARISIAN COFFEE-THEATERS

café-theatre

With the success of one-man-shows, the Parisian theaters are on the rise. These are part of the French artistic heritage and allow little-known comedians to make themselves known to the public.

But do you know when did they appear and what are the main coffee-theaters in Paris ?

Here is a presentation of these highlights.

The beginning of cafe-theaters: cafes first and foremost

The creation of cafes theaters was done in the 1960s in the main French cities. Restaurant managers then allow comedians to introduce themselves and play in their establishment in front of an audience originally coming to eat. The comics then pass with their hat at the end of performance to solicit income.

In Paris, the theatrical cafes were quickly successful on the Left Bank and at Pigalle and in the Marais and quickly shadows the famous Parisian cabarets. Establishments with less than 50 seats bet on new talents.

Some addresses of Parisian cafe-theaters not to be missed!

The cafe-theater “The end” in Pigalle and its 38 seats serves as a training center of French humorists. Comedians like Shirley Souagnon walked the stage. The establishment is also in partnership with the school of one-man-show in Paris. Comedies as well as children’s plays are also played.

La Petite Loge a few steps from the station Saint-Georges is an old theater for children and so small that the stage measures three square meters with 25 seats making it the smallest room in the capital!

Every year the hall and armchairs are restored. Artists like Gaspard Proust and Arnaud Ducret have walked this scene.

The room Popul’Air composed of about forty seats in the district of Belleville to keep its period style. The actors are paid in the hat as in the original tradition. There is an atmosphere of troquet and the reputation of this room by word of mouth.

The Paname Art café is more recent since it opened in 2008. It has fifty seats and artists like Fary and Norman were on stage. It is possible to eat before each show.

For more information on Parisian events do not hesitate to ask to Aloha’s team.

© Pinterest

WALKING ON THE CITE ISLAND

ile-de-la-cite

In spring or summer it is pleasant to walk on the Cité island in the heart of Paris along the quays or in the streets of the neighborhood.

Come discover the key places of this island. Here is also a brief summary of the history of this island.

History of the appearance of the island of the Cité

The island of the Cité is the heart of Paris. This is where the first nucleus of Lutetia was developed. The first inhabitants are fishermen of the Gallic tribe Parisii. In Gallo-Roman times the island is surrounded by ramparts and a forum is built on the island.

It is in the 13th century that Maurice de Sully built the famous cathedral, Notre Dame de Paris.
During the French Revolution, the former Royal Palace was transformed into a Palace of Justice (the same as currently found on the island).

Until the end of the 18th century the island had about 15000 inhabitants and included 4 chapels and about twenty churches. In the 19th century, the island was redeveloped by the Haussmann style of the time and the narrow streets near the cathedral are enlarged.

Places to visit during a walk on the Island of the Cité

It takes about half an hour to tour the island of the Cité by taking the docks but about 1 day to visit all the monuments of the island.

Among these historic monuments, we can mention the Notre Dame Cathedral, the Conciergerie, the Palais de Justice, the Sainte Chapelle …

You can finish your visit by passing in front of the two key institutions of the island: the Prefecture of Police and the Quai des Orfèvres.

A walk on the docks in spring or summer is also a good time.

For more information about the Island de la Cité, visit franceballade.com

THE SECRET HISTORY OF THE BRIDGES OF PARIS

pont-paris

The bridges of Paris are part of the architecture and history of the capital. There are 37 bridges in the capital where locals and tourists like enjoy walking and observing the city all year long. But do you know the history of the bridges of Paris?

Here is a panorama of the origins of the main bridges of the city of Paris.

The history of bridges in the East of Paris

The 174-meter long Austerlitz railway station bridge connects Austerlitz station to Gare de Lyon. It was erected between 1802 and 1807. Its 5 arches were enlarged by 30 m in 1885 and the cast parapets are replaced the same year by stone parapets. The lion surrounded by flags symbolizes the Republic.

The 168 m long Tolbiac Bridge is the last bridge in the city built of stone masonry. Two plaques on the bridge commemorate the tragic event of October 3, 1943 when four French airmen died in an English plane.

The origins of the bridges in the center of Paris

The 62 m long Saint-Michel bridge was built at the request of Napoleon III, the “N” affixed to the bridge symbolizing the latter.

The Small Bridge – Cardinal Lustiger of 31 m was built between 1852 and 1853 and was rebuilt many times following floods of the Seine or after having been carried away by flames.

The history of West Paris bridges

The Bir-Hakeim Bridge (formerly called Passy Footbridge), 247 m long, was built between 1903 and 1905 by the engineer Louis Biette and the architect Jean-Camille Formigé. The lower deck is for cars while on the upper deck passes line 6 of the Paris metro. It was in 1946 that it was renamed Bir-Hakeim Bridge in memory of a French victory over the Germans in Libya.

The Mirabeau bridge, which has three steel spans, is 165 m long. His four sculptures represent Navigation, Abundance, the City of Paris and Commerce.

The 142m long Alma Bridge was built between 1969 and 1973. Only a statue of the old bridge – the famous Zouave – has been preserved. It allows to measure the flood level of the Seine.

For more information, you can look at the website www.paris1900.artnouveau.com